Incentives & Schemes

Smart City Scheme (SCS)

Aim of Scheme

The aim of a Smart City project  is to create working, living and leisure space that will be environment-friendly; aim at generating its own resources in terms of energy and water; provide for state of the art connectivity; provide smart modern transportation; and reduce traffic congestion.

Terms and Conditions

Under the Smart City Scheme (SCS), a project, other than a technopole project, should :
1. be developed on land of an extent of at least 21.105 hectares (50 arpents) and include
2. adhere to the live, work and play concept and shall provide for a majority of the residential population to live and work in the same location
3. incorporate within the development a mix of compatible land use including commercial, leisure and residential and consisting of a combination of office, light industrial, hotel, retail, public entertainment and housing so that the inclusive development achieves physical and functional integration and creates a pedestrian oriented urban environment
4. have at least 25 percent of the residential properties sold to citizens of Mauritius or members of the Mauritian Diaspora registered with the Board of Investment under the Mauritian Diaspora Scheme

Components of the Smart City Scheme

A smart city project, other than a technopole project, must include:
1. business facilities, with a mandatory innovation cluster
2. residential properties on the condition that the land area planned for the construction of residential properties does not exceed 50 percent of the total land area
3. affordable housing units for middle-income earners
4. civic centres and leisure amenities
5. high-quality public spaces that help promote social interaction and a sense of community, including but not limited to gardens, open plazas, cycle routes and pedestrian precincts
6. day-to-day management services
7. use of information and communication technology to sense, analyse and integrate the key information to provide intelligent urban management and services
8. the use technology products or practices resulting in substantial operational cost savings through reduced energy consumption and utility costs
9. measures which to the extent possible –
i. generate their own energy requirements through eco-friendly mechanisms such as solar plants and wind farms
ii. produce their own water needs; and
iii. are autonomous in their waste management systems.
10. Social programmes and obligations

Development Model

The development model for smart city projects includes the Smart City Company, the Smart City Developer and the Smart City Management Company.

1. The Smart City Company is the landlord developer which will:
a. design and submit a project under the Smart City Scheme to the Board of Investment for approval
b. be responsible for the implementation of all components of the project
c. develop bare land into serviced land
d. engage in building, developing, managing and executing specific projects
e. sell serviced land to other companies which will act as Smart City Developers to develop and execute specific projects in a smart city
2. The Smart City Developer is a company which has:
a. acquired a portion of land from the smart city company to develop one or more component of the smart city
b. acts in concert with the smart city company
c. execute the specific component of the project.
3. Every Smart City Company shall set up a Smart City Management Company.  The objective of the Smart City Management Company is to manage a smart city under the Scheme using Internet, new high-performance digitalised technologies and high-tech methods with a view to maintaining the sustainability, innovativeness and eco-friendliness of the smart city, as well as connecting people and integrating information and elements in order to increase the quality of life of its residents.
The functions of the Smart City Management Company include:
a. the tasks of a syndic in accordance with the Code Civil Mauricien;
b. providing security, maintenance, gardening, solid waste disposal and other services;
c. maintaining and managing open public spaces;
d. providing an intelligent response to different kinds of needs, including daily livelihood, environmental protection, public safety and city services, industrial and commercial activities;
e. implementing and managing a real-time sensor network system that automatically monitors and detect changes in the status of public infrastructure to ensure the quick and appropriate provision of services; and
f. the use of smart energy management technologies to help suppliers of utility services and distributors to forecast and manage energy loads.

Support Agency/ies:

Board of Investment
10th Floor, One Cathedral Square Building
16, Jules Koenig Street
Port-Louis 11328
Republic of Mauritius
T: +230 203 3800
F: + 230 208 2924
E: contact@investmauritius.com
W: www.investmauritius.com

Australia

June 1995
Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI)

China

April 1997
China Council for the Promotion of International Trade (CCPIT) - Beijing
China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission - Shanghai
November 1998
CCPIT Guangdong Sub-Council
September 2008
CCPIT Qingdao
May 2007
CCPIT Qingdao

Austria

September 2014
Austrian Federal Economic Chamber

France

September 1996
l’Assemblée des Chambres Françaises de Commerce et d’Industrie (ACFCI)

India

November 1985
Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI)
May 1996
Confederation of Indian Industry (CII)
June 1995
Tamil Nadu Chamber of Commerce and Industry
January 2004
India International Trade Center
May 2004
Seafood Exporters Association of India
October 2005
Seafood Exporters Association of India

Kenya

January 2011
The Kenya National Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KNCCI)

Madagascar

November 2004
Fédération des Chambres de Commerce, d’Industrie, d’Artisanat et d’Agriculture de Madagascar

Malaysia

August 1994
The National Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Malaysia
June 2005
Malaysian Associated Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry

Mozambique

September 2012
Chamber of Commerce of Mozambique)

Pakistan

October 2004
The Federation of Pakistan Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FPCCI)

Russia

May 2007
Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation

Sri Lanka

May 2004
National Chamber of Commerce of Sri Lanka

Tanzania

January 2011
The Tanzania Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture (TCCIA)

Thailand

August 2004
The Federation of Thai Industries (F.T.I)
February 2013
TUSKON

Turkey

August 2014
DEIK (Foreign Economic Relations Board)
TOBB (The Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges of Turkey)

Réunion

June 1995
Chambre of Commerce and d’Industrie de la Réunion
March 2002
L’Association pour le Développement Industriel de la Réunion

Seychelles

November 2005
Seychelles Chamber of Commerce and Industry
April 2014
Seychelles Chamber of Commerce and Industry

Djibouti

August 2008
Chamber of Commerce of Djibouti

Increase of 4.9 percent in the Business Confidence Indicator
31 Jan 2017 Economy

Increase of 4.9 percent in the Business Confidence…

Decrease of 5.1 percent in the Business Confidence Indicator
31 Oct 2016 Economy

Decrease of 5.1 percent in the Business Confidence…

Mauritius ranked 49th in the World Bank Doing Business Report 2017
27 Oct 2016 Economy

Mauritius ranked 49th in the World Bank Doing Busi…

MCCI Economic Outlook 2016/ 2017: Growth rate of 3.4 percent and 3.7 percent for 2016 and 2017
26 Sep 2016 Economy

MCCI Economic Outlook 2016/ 2017: Growth rate of 3…

Increase of 4 % in the Business Confidence Indicator
11 Aug 2016 Economy

Increase of 4 % in the Business Confidence Indicat…

Bank of Mauritius cuts down repo rate by 0.40 basis points
21 Jul 2016 Economy

Bank of Mauritius cuts down repo rate by 0.40 basi…

MCCI Economic Review 2015 released
31 May 2016 Economy

MCCI Economic Review 2015 released

Increase of 0.9% in the Business Confidence Indicator
03 May 2016 Economy

Increase of 0.9% in the Business Confidence Indica…

Increase of 6.0% in the Business Confidence Indicator
12 Feb 2016 Economy

Increase of 6.0% in the Business Confidence Indica…

GDP Growth Rate estimated at 3.9 percent for 2016
12 Jan 2016 Economy

GDP Growth Rate estimated at 3.9 percent for 2016

Decrease of 1.9% in the Business Confidence Indicator
29 Oct 2015 Economy

Decrease of 1.9% in the Business Confidence Indica…

Increase in the Business Confidence Indicator for the 2nd quarter of 2015
03 Aug 2015 Economy

Increase in the Business Confidence Indicator for …

Growth projections of Statistics Mauritius
09 Jul 2015 Economy

Growth projections of Statistics Mauritius

Prévisions économiques : Un taux de croissance de 3,7 % en 2015 à Maurice
16 Jun 2015 Economy

Prévisions économiques : Un taux de croissance de …

Increase of 6.5% in the Business Confidence Indicator
30 Apr 2015 Economy

Increase of 6.5% in the Business Confidence Indica…

Impact of ‘Cost of Doing Business’ indicators on the growth rate in Mauritius
31 Jan 2015 Economy

Impact of ‘Cost of Doing Business’ indicators on t…

Increase of 6.4% in the Business Confidence Indicator
31 Jan 2015 Economy

Increase of 6.4% in the Business Confidence Indica…

Economic Development Vision 2030 High-Powered Committee to be set up
29 Jan 2015 Economy

Economic Development Vision 2030 High-Powered Comm…

GDP growth rate estimated at 3.5 percent for 2014
12 Jan 2015 Economy

GDP growth rate estimated at 3.5 percent for 2014

Cost of doing business
09 Dec 2014 Economy

Cost of doing business

The Winning Formula !
20 Aug 2014 Economy

The Winning Formula !

The New Economy
15 Jul 2014 Economy

The New Economy

  • Smart City Scheme (SCS)
  • Smart City Scheme (SCS)